Superman has limitless speed and strength. Spiderman scales walls. These heroes undoubtedly keep cities safe, but they happen to be fiction. In the real world, there are very real heroes walking among us – often going unrecognized. These are our Safety Heroes.

It’s these safety leaders who fervently establish safe work environments – that ensure the companies we work for remain viable. They protect our friends and family, allowing them to return home at the end of each shift. Taking a look back at 2018, we’ve captured three of our most popular Safety Heroes. Although they all deserve kudos, vote for the Safety Hero below who you believe should be named Safety Hero of the Year.

Here are the three nominees:

Danielle Smith

“I, unfortunately, experienced a fatality some time ago. It was just before I was to assume direct responsibility for safety operations and it jarred me. It showed me just how important our role as safety professionals is – that it’s quite literally a matter of life and death,” says Safety Hero Danielle Smith, who says the situation changed her outlook forever. “It put my upcoming role into perspective and has made me a better safety professional,” she explains.

After years of working as an environmental remediation specialist and EHS engineer for several companies in Ohio, today Danielle is the Director of Environmental, Health, and Safety at Lykin’s Energy Solutions. “We, [as safety professionals,] are here to help and when everyone realizes that, the workplace will become much safer as a whole,” she says

Keep reading her spotlight here to see what she says is most important to be effective as a safety leader.

Chris Snyder 

Safety Hero Chris Snyder has seen two major events that changed how he views and approaches safety.

“The first was a plane crash that took 21 lives. I was working on the emergency response team at US Airways when that accident occurred and that experience was one I’ll never forget. The second event was later in my career when I was responsible for Safety at a ground handling company. A 21-year old girl flipped a baggage tug while driving it at a high rate of speed…Luckily she was wearing her seatbelt. It actually saved her life that day,” he shares.

“Those two events put my role into perspective and continue to remind me how important safety is at our jobs.”

Chris is truly a jack of all safety trades. From the author of safety manuals to an expert in safety improvement, Chris has done a lot over his 30-plus year career when it comes to supporting the health and safety of workers. Much of his career has been focused in the aviation sector, where he helped companies implement a culture of safety.

Currently, Chris is the Safety Coordinator for the City of Fairfield Ohio—proving that safety leaders really can do it all. Keep reading his spotlight here to learn his superpower, and how that helps him in his day-to-day role.

Wes Golden

Beginning his career as a firefighter for the Clarksville, Tennessee fire department, Safety Hero Wes Golden continued his career at Dow Corning where he worked in safety and loss prevention. Following Dow, Golden worked in the automotive sector for two years, among other roles, and now he’s returned as the Health & Safety Manager for the City of Clarksville.

Wes says there are three things that make for an effective safety leader: “They need to be fighters in the sense that they have to fight for the policies or procedures that will work best. They need to be salespeople in that they need to be able to convey the importance of safety to every party within the organization,” he says. “Lastly, they need to be auditors in that they must be diligent in how they inspect their programs and processes.”

Keep reading his spotlight here to see what Wes says he wants everyone to know about safety, and why “safety is all about the act of caring.”

vote for the 2018 safety hero of the year

 

Vote for the 2018 Safety Hero of the Year here.